We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.

Advertiser Disclosure

Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.

How We Make Money

We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently from our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What is a Crusher?

Malcolm Tatum
By
Updated May 17, 2024
Our promise to you
About Mechanics is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At About Mechanics, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Crushers are devices that are designed to decrease the size of larger objects by using force to reducing the objects into a smaller and more compact volume. This is sometimes accomplished by compacting the mass of the object. At other times, the crusher will be used force to break the object into a series of smaller pieces.

The action of any type of crusher makes use of force as a means of accomplishing the tasking of crushing objects. Essentially, crushing involves the transference of force that is increased by mechanical advantage and thus will distribute the force along the body of the object. This usually involves placing the object between two solid surfaces. One of the surfaces acts as a platform and provides a location to place the object. The second surface is usually located above the object and platform, and slowly lowers to exert force on the object. As the force crushes the object, the upper surface continues to descend until an optimal degree of reduction in size has occurred.

Crushing is helpful in a variety of applications. Around the house, a small manual crusher is often used to reduce the size of aluminum cans. This action makes it possible to store the crushed cans until a sufficient quantity is collected to transport to a recycling facility. Manual crushers of this type are often very inexpensive, and take up no more room than a standard countertop kitchen appliance.

A crusher may be utilized to break up objects such as rocks. Crushers of this type are often used in scientific research, as they make it possible to crush a larger rock sample into smaller pieces and thus examine the content of the rock in more detail. At the same time, an ore crusher is sometimes used in mining operations as a means of evaluating the content of the ore that is extracted from a particular dig site.

Larger crushers are automated and perform more complex jobs. Mechanical crushers are often employed at auto junkyards. Once all useful components are removed from the vehicle, the remaining carcass of the car or truck is loaded into a large crusher that will reduce the size of the vehicle to a fraction of the original size. The crushed vehicle can then be recycled into other useful products. A crusher of this type is intended for mass use in an industrial setting, and normally is very expensive.

About Mechanics is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Malcolm Tatum
By Malcolm Tatum , Writer
Malcolm Tatum, a former teleconferencing industry professional, followed his passion for trivia, research, and writing to become a full-time freelance writer. He has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including About Mechanics, and his work has also been featured in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and newspapers. When not writing, Malcolm enjoys collecting vinyl records, following minor league baseball, and cycling.

Discussion Comments

By macy — On Jul 30, 2013

A rock crusher is used to crush large stones into small ones. Many use rock crushers to create gravel for driveways.

By whiteplane — On Dec 16, 2011

My parents have a trash compactor in their kitchen instead of a traditional trash can. It is smaller than most kitchen trash cans but with the compacting feature it is able to hold more trash.

It is kind of an old fashioned model and sort of loud and slow. But it works as well as the day it was installed and there is really no reason to get rid of it. The only downside is that it requires special bags that are more expensive than regular trash bags. They are pretty crucial too. I tried using a contractor bag once and it ended up shredded. Regardless, its a handy kitchen tool.

By Ivan83 — On Dec 16, 2011

When people hear about crushers they often think about the ones they have at junkyards that can reduce a car into a tidy little cube. I saw a video on the internet recently of a new kind of machine that shreds cars. The shredded metal can then be compacted into even smaller cubes, or it can be shipped directly to a processing facility.

The video was incredible because it looks like a ca going into a garbage disposal. The shredder tears the whole thing into a pile of metal strips in just a little over 2 minutes. Its one of the gnarlier things I've ever seen. I don't know how widespread the technology is but it might make the crusher a thing of the past.

Malcolm Tatum

Malcolm Tatum

Writer

Malcolm Tatum, a former teleconferencing industry professional, followed his passion for trivia, research, and writing...
Learn more
About Mechanics, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

About Mechanics, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.