We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.
Machinery

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

What is a Balancing Machine?

Sara Schmidt
By
Updated: May 17, 2024

In order to establish and maintain proper tension in a machine, a mechanic often needs the help of a specialized tool. A balancing machine is used to help create this type of symmetry within rotating machines. It can perform this task through individual part rotation and sensor detection.

In a typical balancing machine, a set of two firm pedestals are accompanied by bearings and a suspension. Most machines have the capability to balance a variety of parts. These parts can include rotors for electric motors, disc drives, turbines, disc brakes, fans, pumps, and propellers.

To use a balancing machine, the item requiring alignment may be placed directly onto the bearings, either manually or mechanically. The unit is then rotated, using an air-, end-, or belt-drive. During the rotation, the item will vibrate. This vibration will enable the attached sensors within the machine to determine how unbalanced the unit may be, and therefore how much shift is needed to establish equilibrium. It can also pinpoint where weights are needed, if any, for balancing, and where the weights should be placed.

Many types of balancing machines exist. The two main types, hard-bearing and soft-bearing machines, differ in their suspensions. Hard-bearing balance machines involve a lower frequency use, and are more flexible as well as durable. They can be used for objects with weights that vary greatly.

Soft-bearing machines require a higher frequency, and are less flexible to use. They entail a new calibration for each use, and may be used for balancing items of a very precise nature. Though considered more time consuming, soft bearing machines are ideal for high-production jobs.

A static balancing machine allows a part to remain stationary while being measured. Also known as a vertical balancing machine, it calculates balance by how far the part might move away from its geometric center while standing at rest. Blade balancing machines are used for balancing units during assembly in order to prevent additional corrections after a product is complete. Used on items such as turbines, fans, and propellers, they weigh each blade during creation. Then they enter blade weights into a software program that sorts them into usable arrangements.

For instruments that cannot be easily disassembled, such as machines that are currently in use, portable balancing machines may be used. Through displacement sensors mounted onto a part, they measure vibrations while a machine is in operation. This identifies which parts are in need of balancing.

About Mechanics is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Sara Schmidt
By Sara Schmidt
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for About Mechanics, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
Discussion Comments
Sara Schmidt
Sara Schmidt
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for About Mechanics, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
Share
About Mechanics, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

About Mechanics, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.